The man who had been born blind could now see! He had met with Jesus, and done what Jesus had told him to do, and he was thrilled with his new sight. His neighbors were all trying to figure it out– where was Jesus now, anyway? And, since no one knew, and because the healing had taken place on the Sabbath, they took the man to the Pharisees to sort it out. There, he told them what had taken place.There followed an argument among the Pharisees–some said that Jesus could not be of God because He healed on the Sabbath, while others pointed out that His miracles could not be done by a common, sinful man.

“What do you think of the man who healed you?” they asked the man who had just received his sight. “He must be a prophet!” he responded.

Caught in a quandary over the situation, the Pharisees even  called the man’s parents to testify– after all, had this man really been blind? What if he was an imposter?

And his parents, terrified at being called before the religious authorities (who had announced that anyone who claimed that Jesus was the Messiah would be expelled from the synagogue), verified that he had been born blind, but claimed total ignorance of the circumstances of his healing. “He’s old enough to speak for himself,” they said. “Ask him.”

Summoning the man who had been healed again, the Pharisees said “Give God the glory, because we know this man Jesus is a sinner.”

“I don’t know anything about that,” he replied, “but I do know this; I was blind, and now I can see!”

Every time I read this story, I love the character of this man. He’d obviously suffered a lot in his forty years of blindness, yet his upbeat, undefeated, unintimidated, and loyal spirit shines through. He says things just the way he sees them, and doesn’t care who is listening. He wasn’t going to let the arguing and nit-picking of the Pharisees spoil the fact that he now could see, nor would he denounce Jesus in order to remain in good standing at the synagogue.

 

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